Tagged: Nationals Park

Brewers at Natstown (4/18/10)

Without exception, Tim and I always have a great time when we go to a baseball game.  But whenever we drive to Camden Yards or Nationals Park, we pass a certain baseball/softball field on I-83 South, just a couple miles before Shrewsbury, PA, and I always look to see if a game is in progress.  If a game is being played, I just know the day is going to be special.

At 9:53 a.m. on April 18, 2010 it was “game on”…


1 - shrewsbury softball field.jpg…we were about to experience a near perfect day.  In fact, it would prove to be one of those “this is what life is all about” days.  A father, a son, a memorable interaction with a new hero of the game, a spot in the warm sun eating ice cream, our Nation’s capitol, a future hall of famer showing he’s still got it, a game full of memorable moments, and a lap around the bases.

It all unfolded at Nationals Park…

2 - brewers and nats in DC.jpg…and it featured the Milwaukee Brewers and the Washington Nationals.

We arrived early for BP.  As we entered the seats in RCF, Nationals coach Julian Martinez was about to toss a ball into the stands.  There was another father and son in the same section and as we walked down to the first row, the father (whose name I never got) pointed at us, and just like that Martinez redirected his attention and threw us a ball.

4 - W-Training Ball.jpgAs I held it in my hand, it felt weird.  Extra soft leather.  I later discovered it was our first ever “Official Training Ball.”

The D.C. Dad came over and said they’d already got a ball or two.  It was incredibly nice of him to give us the assist.  We ended up chatting for 10-15 minutes while we watched incredibly unimpressive BP by the Nats.  He and his boy (who seemed to be about 8-9) live in the area, but far enough out that they were staying in a hotel for a couple weekend games.  Two guys forging their own father-son memories.  It was great chatting with them and I can’t thank them enough for helping us get a ball.  We never know if we’ll be able to catch one at any given game.  So it was great to secure the souviner.  However, by the end of the day I felt a little bad that they gave up the ball for us, because we ended up having unprecedented luck.  Anyway, many, many, many thanks, D.C. Dad and D.C. son.  We hope you had a great weekend at the ballpark.

We split up after the Brewers started hitting.  They went to explore elsewhere and we stuck around to see if Prince Fielder would be able to find us with a moon shot.

Tim was having fun spitting seeds into the gap between the wall and the seats…

3 - BP and Hoffman.jpg…I was having fun watching all-time saves leader Trevor Hoffman get in a little workout.

Then something funny happened.  The man with one of the weirdest batting stances around, Craig Counsell, hit a ball through the open fence in CF into a storage area.  And then someone else in the Brewers’ first BP rotation hit another ball into the storage area…

5 - CF storage area.jpg….in the picture above to the right, we were standing in the corner in the yellow circle.  Counsell’s ball went into that opening and against a spare BP screen against the wall (see the red arrow).  The second ball stopped right in the middle of the pavement behind the CF wall.

Within 2-3 minutes, a Nationals stadium attendant walked by and grabbed the second ball from the middle of the pavement and tossed it up to us.  And 2-3 minutes later, another guy did the same thing with the Counsell ball.  Both had sharpie marks across the “sweet spot”:  a black squiggle on the Counsell ball and a straight blue line on the second ball.

That was it.  Three balls with no effort was enough for one BP session.  So we took off, and got this picture of Tim (who is sporting his “Diego” gloves and a new Mariners backpack) on our way out of the seats:

6 - BP Backpack Time For Playarea.jpgIt was time to visit the play area:

7 - natstown playarea.jpgWe came back here about 4 times throughout the day.  The area was packed with kids.  Tim had an absolute blast.

After about 10 minutes, we left because D.C. Dad mentioned several Nats sign autographs at the dugouts before each Sunday game.  Tim seems to like collecting autographs since he asked Jeremy Accardo last season to “scribble on my baseball.”

On our way to the first base dugout, we walked slowly and watched the Brewers hit a little more.  An usher gave Tim a baseball that was hit into the seats.  Thanks to mygameballs.com, I knew that it was the 50th baseball that Tim and I have got together over the course of Tim’s first 56 MLB games.  (FYI, mygameballs.com says it was our 52nd ball, but that is only because I recorded two of my Kingdome balls from long before Tim was born — had to represent for the Kingdome).

Anyway, one of my goals this season is to try to get pictures with a player from as many different teams as possible.  So, after Scott Olsen signed Tim’s new “Official Practice Ball,” I snapped this picture…

8 - Scott Olsen.jpg…player picture number 1 on the season — Tim and an official Washington National (the aforementioned Scott Olsen).

Back to the play area.

After 10 minutes in the play area, Tim and I left to see if any Brewers were out and about with whom we might be able to get a picture.  BP was finished and they were preparing the field.  But one single player was on the field.  It was a Brewer and he was signing autographs by the 3B dugout.  We quickly made our way over from CF thinking all the while he would leave before we made it to the dugout.  But he didn’t.

At the time, I didn’t know who it was.  Tim handed his baseball up to him (the Brewers BP ball with the blue sharpie line on it) and asked for his autograph.  Turns out it was Jeff Suppan — I could actually read his autograph!

I’ll admit it.  I’ve never liked Jeff Suppan.  I had no basis.  He was just unimpressive to me.  I’ve known the name for years, but never had a good feeling about him.  But he was beyond cool to us.  He was outstanding.

Some players just grab your baseball when you ask for an autograph and don’t say a word (admittedly some fans just hand the ball over without saying anything), but not Suppan.  He greeted Tim’s inquiry with a warm, “Of course, I will, little guy.”  (Or something along those lines).

As he signed, I asked him if I could stand Tim up on the railing for a picture with Suppan.  In response, he focused on the standing on the railing part, not the posing for a picture part.  He said, “Its alright by me!”  Then, he leaned in for this GREAT picture:

9 - Jeff Suppan.jpgAnd he wasn’t done yet.  After the picture, he made a little small talk with Tim and then he stuck out his fist and said, “Hey, pound my fist!”  Tim looked confused and opted for giving him “five.”  Suppan replied, “Oh, no problem.  High five!”   Tim happily complied.

Its a total make over for Jeff Suppan in my mind.  He didn’t have to act like that and most players wouldn’t.  He went above-and-beyond the call of duty to give Tim a great experience.  Based on his outstanding treatment of Tim, he is now my favorite Brewer and I will be pulling for him from here on out (unless pitching against the Mariners, in which case I still hope he gets shelled).

THANK YOU, JEFF SUPPAN!  Very cool.  Awesome.  Outstanding!

Next, it was back to the play area.  More fun.

Then, Tim and I took a little tour of the upper deck down the 3B line…and I took an unruly amount of panoramas.  Here we go…

Nationals Park section 401 (last row):

10 - nats section 401 panorama.jpgHere is Tim, acting as tour guide:

11 - walking the upperdeck.jpgNationals Park sections 402-403 (last row):

12 - nats section 402-403 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 403-404 (last row):

13 - nats section 403-404 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 404-405 (last row):

14 - nats section 404-405 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 405-406 (last row):

15 - nats section 405-406 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 406-407 (last row).

16 - nats section 406-407 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 407-408 (last row):

17 - nats section 407-408 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 408-409 (last row):

18 - nats section 408-409 panorama.jpgNationals Park section 409 (last row):

19 - nats section 409 panorama.jpgNationals Park section 311 (concourse): — if you click to enlarge this picture you can see the U.S. Capitol building behind the light stand above the red roof in LF:

20 - nats section 311 panorama.jpgNationals Park sections 313-314 (concourse) — now the U.S. Capitol building is above the right side of the red roof in LF:

21 - nats section 313-314 panorama.jpgTim presides over Nationals Park at sections 318-319:

22 - nats section 318-319 panorama.jpgFinally, we grabbed some nachos for lunch and sat down here — Nationals Park section 222U, row T, seats 25-26 (aisle seats):

23 - nats section 222U row T seats 25-26.jpgThats where we were when the game began.  And it got interesting real quick.  What happened in the top of the first also happened in the bottom of the second at our Pirates vs. Cubs game last season and I did a play by play.  So lets do it again:

Jason Marquis made the start for the Nationals

  1. Rickie Weeks – single to 3B/SS
  2. Craig Counsell – single to CF
  3. Ryan Braun – single to LF (on the swing pictured below); Weeks scores (1-0)

24 - braun rbi hit.jpgNachos done and with it cold and windy in section 222U, we took to our feet as Prince Fielder stepped into the batters box.  I snapped this shot as we passed by section 231:

25 - nats section 231 panorama.jpg

4.  Prince Fielder – hit by pitch (to load the bases)

5.  Casey McGehee – walk (it looked like it hit him, but it was ball four); Counsell scores (2-0)

6.  Jim Edmonds – hit by pitch; Braun scores (3-0)

7.  Greg Zuan – single to LF; Fielder scores (4-0) — still no outs!

28 - sticky situation in first.jpg

Former Mariner Miguel Batista relieved Marquis (whose ERA on the day was infinity).

8.  Carlos Gomez – infield single to 3B (looked like an error to me); McGehee scores (5-0)

9.  Doug Davis – sacrifice fly to CF; Edmonds scores (6-0) — the crowd goes crazy for the first out

10.  Rickie Weeks – walk (re-loads bases)

11.  Craig Counsell – grand slam; Zaun, Gomez, Weeks and Counsell score (10-0)

12.  Ryan Braun – swinging strike out

13.  Prince Fielder – walk

14.  Casey McGehee – ground out to 2B — inning ended, damage done.

 

29 - 1 out 10 in.jpg

There you go, two season in a row now we have witnessed a 10-run half-inning.

By the way, we watched most of the inning from here — Nationals Park section 239 (concourse behind last row):

26 - nats section 239 panorama.jpgI took a ton of pictures at this game — over 300, in fact — including tons of action shots.

Here are a couple of Prince Fielder, who refused to go yard for us:

27 - prince fielder hitting.jpg

After the top of the 1st, we went back to the play area, where I reported to the dismayed stadium attendants that the score was 10-0 Brewers already.  It was our final stop at the play area.  Once again, fun times ensued.

Then it was back to the second deck in CF, where I got these action shots of Adam Dunn grounding out to Prince Fielder in the bottom of the third:

30 - dunn done.jpgHere was the view from CF — Nationals Park section 242 (handicap accessible seating area):

31 - nats section 242 panorama.jpgWhile we were out there, future hall of famer, Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez, hit a double off of the wall in LCF (I thought Braun was going to catch it):

32 - pudge doubles.jpg

It was extremely windy at certain spots in the ballpark and it was fairly cold in the shade.  But Tim still asked for an ice cream helmet.  I knew we’d need to find some sunny ice cream seats…

33 - ice cream in the sun.jpg…we found them in section 134.  Tim enjoyed his real ice cream mint chocolate chip ice cream helmet.  (NOTE – in a possibly unprecedented move, the Nationals are charging $2.00 for hot fudge topping this season.  Not cool.).

Here is the view from the seats in which we sat until the 9th inning — Nationals Park section 134:

34 - nats section 134 panorama.jpgI took some random action shots.  Here is one that I liked featuring winning pitcher, Claudio Vargas, Prince Fielder at first, and baserunner Josh Willingham:

35 - vargas fielder willingham.jpgIn the bottom of the seventh, Ian Desmond (I think) hit a ball to center fielder Carlos Gomez, who made a valiant effort…

36 - no catch.jpg…but couldn’t come up with it — he trapped it.

Tim usually likes to roam around a lot when its just the two of us, but he was very content to just hang out in these sunny seats and watch the game…

37 - watching baseball.jpg…okay, he played around and acted a fool a little bit too.

In the top of the sixth, Fielder still refused to hit a bomb for us.  Instead, he popped out to Ryan Zimmerman at 3B:

38 - prince to zimmerman in the 6th.jpg

Late in the game, it was time for the Presidents to race.  I was excited to see if Teddy Roosevelt could finally notch his first victory.  But when the CF fence opened, some make-shift Milkaukee sausages came racing out along the warning track instead of the Presidents…

39 - teddy forks some sausage.jpg…then three of the Presidents (but not Teddy) came racing out from CF too.  Teddy was waiting down the 1B foul line with a couple big forks.  He skewered the first three sausages and then body slammed the Chorizo.  Amongst the carnage, the other Presidents raced by to beat the sausages.

In the ninth, we decided to relocate to the 3B line to see if we could get an umpire ball after the game — something we tried for once at Nationals Park last season but were denied.

First, we walked by the Nationals bullpen.  A reliever was warming up.  Nats bullpen coach, Jim Lett, looked up and spotted us.  He motioned to us.   And then fired a ball up to us, we never even asked for it.  And just like that, we had our fifth ball of the day.  Once last season we got 4 from the Mariners in Toronto, but this fifth baseball was totally unprecedented territory for us

Thanks, Mr. Lett!

So, we headed over to the 3B side.  We grabbed some seats.  This was our view from the top of section 117:

40 - nats section 117 panorama.jpgI snapped this picture.  It looks like Rickie Weeks whiffing at a pitch.  In reality, its future hall of famer Ivan Rodriguez catching a Rickie Weeks whiff:

41 - weeks whiffin HOFer  catchin.jpgBefore eventually striking out, Rickie connected for this harmless foul ball to RF — harmless only because Christian Guzman couldn’t quite get there:

42 - harmless foul in 9th.jpgAs you can see in the bottom right of that last picture, there were a bunch of kids at the end of the dugout where the umpire leaves the field.  I decided not to try for an umpire ball.

Instead, I took this shot of Adam Dunn hitting a single in the bottom of the ninth:

43 - bottom 9 dunn singles.jpgThen a cameraman set his sights on a group of girls a couple seats over from us, so Tim went and danced behind them and I got this picture…

44 - nats scoreboard background.jpg…I missed the shot of Tim looking at the camera waving.

After the dancing, we saw some of those kids leave.  So we headed down to about the 10th row.  As I sat down, Tim said, “Closer!  Closer!”  He ran down to the first row where one guy was in the corner seat but the other three seats were empty.

Tim made this “silly face” (that’s what he called it) in this picture that shows how ridiculously good these seats are:

45 - first row ho hum silly face.jpgMore Pudge pictures:

46 - no dice for pudge.jpg…he eventually grounded out to end the game.

47 - brewers win.jpgBREWERS WIN!

And guess who home plate umpire Mike Everitt threw a ball to as he approached the umpire tunnel?   Were we in the twilight zone?  We had amassed six baseballs!

The strangness wasn’t over just yet.  It was time for Kids Run the Bases.  As we watched the Brewers celebrate their win, the stadium emptied in record speed.  Meanwhile, Todd Coffey started playing long toss with LaTroy Hawkins in LF-to-CF.  How often does that happen after a game?  Anyway, we had to head out to CF to exit the stadium and get in the Kids Run The Bases line.  As we passed through the LF seats, there was literally NO ONE around.  It was weird because the game had just ended 5-10 minutes earlier.

Anyway, Coffey and Hawkins finished up.  Hawkins looked up.  He fired his ball to us and over shot us be 7 rows.  As it rifled over our heads, I thought “Oh, well.  We have six baseballs!  Someone else will grab that one.”  I turned around, zero people in sight.  Ball rattles around and deflects back to the first row.  We walk over and pick it up.  Seven baseballs!

Hawkins yells, “Sorry!”  No problem, LaTroy. 

Thanks!

What a weird day.  We made almost no effort and walked out of Nationals Park with seven baseballs.  A new Cook & Son record.

Then it was time!  Kids Run the Bases.  We love it.

48 - tim on nats bases 2010.jpgTim sprinted as fast as he could.  He loved it.

We got a couple more pictures on our way out of the stadium…

49 - one last nats picture.jpg…and, what the heck, one more panorama (section 110)…

50 - nats section 110 panorama.jpg

…what a day.  We had so much fun its ridiculous.  We even had fun on the walk to the car.

A couple minutes later, Tim was fast asleep.

51 - natstown baseballs etc.jpg

2010 Fan Stats:

2 Games

4 Teams (Orioles and Blue Jays; Brewers and Nationals)

2 Ice Cream Helmets (Orioles & Nationals)

10 Baseballs (3 Brewers, 3 Nationals, 2 Blue Jays, 2 Umpires)

2 Stadiums (Camden Yards, Nationals Park)

2 Player Photos (Jeff Suppan and Scott Olsen)

2 Autographs (Jeff Suppan and Scott Olsen)

1 Kids Run The Bases (Nationals Park)

Satellite Views of our 2010 Season

Over the past several months, I have slowly been planning our 2010 season.  Like in 2009, Tim and I will visit 13 MLB stadiums (with an outside, but very unlikely, chance that we’ll hit a 14th stadium).  I have many of our games planned out and tickets secured.   Other games are tentatively planned, but still uncertain.  Whatever the order and whatever the actual games end up being, we will definitely make it to each of the following stadiums (as seen via Google Earth and Bing satellite views).

Like in 2008 and 2009, we plan to begin our 2010 season at our second favorite stadium:

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

1 - Camden Yards satellite.jpg

Next, we’ll stick in the region.  Our second game of 2010 will be at:

Nationals Park

2 - Nationals Park satellite.jpg

Next, we’ll be off to the Big Apple for a game at:

Citi Field

3 - Citi Field satellite.jpg

FYI, I couldn’t find any satellite views of Queens post-Shea.  Therefore, I cut out Shea’s infield and guestimated where Citi Field’s infield now lies.  I could be totally off, but I think the Jackie Robinson Rotunda takes up a lot of space under my red arrow.

Okay, since originally posting this, I found a different type of arial view on Bing.com.  Here you go:

 

3a - Citi Field satellite.jpgNext, we’ll be sticking closer to home for a very special game at:

Citizens Bank Park

4 - Citizens Bank Park satellite.jpgNext, we enter a period of uncertainty.  We’ll probably be back at Camden Yards and Citizen Bank Park before hitting any new stadiums.  I think the next stadium we visit will be on the Third Annual Cook Grandfather-Father-Son Baseball Roadtrip of 2010.  Our first game on the roadtrip will be at:

Oakland-Alameda County Colesium

5 - Oakland-Alameda County Colesium satellite.jpgFrom Oakland, we will drive to Los Angeles for a game at the only MLB stadium in the City or County of Los Angeles:

Dodger Stadium

6 - Dodger Stadium satellite.jpgFrom L.A., we will continue down the coast for a couple games at:

Petco Park

7 - Petco Park satellite.jpgOn the way back up, we will next visit the site of my personal MLB debut:

Angel Stadium of Anaheim (Not Los Angeles)

8 - Angel Stadium of Anaheim satellite.jpgFinally, we will wrap up the roadtrip at:

AT&T Park

9 - AT&T Park satellite.jpgAfter the Roadtrip, we will again enter a period of uncertainty.  Again, I predict more games at Citizens Bank Park and/or Camden Yards before hitting any new parks.  The next new park we will visit after the roadtrip will almost certainly be:

Progressive Field

10 - Progressive Field satellite.jpgShortly after visiting Progressive Field, we will again visit the site of Tim’s Third Baseball Anniversary game:

Yankee Stadium

11 - Yankee Stadium satellite.jpgAgain, I could not find a satellite view that shows the current Yankee Stadium.  So, I cut out the infield of now demonlished 1923 version and pasted it roughly where I estimate the infield lies in the current Yankee Stadium.

Like Citi Field, since posting this entry, I have now found a different view on Bing.com that shows Yankee Stadium (2009):

 

11a - Yankee Stadium satellite.jpgOnly two stadiums to go.  While we conceivably could visit the next stadium early in the season, most likely we won’t make it to Pittsburgh until Septembe for a couple games at:

PNC Park

12 - PNC Park satellite.jpgLast, but certainly not least, we will end our season with our Mariners at our favorite ball park in all the land:

Safeco Field

13 - Safeco Field satellite.jpg

And there you have it, the stadiums that Tim and I will visit in 2010.  I had originally wanted to spend the 4th of July weekend in Detroit to see the Mariners play at Comerica Park.  But that just isn’t going to happen…and I highly doubt we will make it to Comerica at any point this season.  Maybe next year.

One comment about these satellite views.  I did not rotate any of the stadiums.  Therefore, you can see that home plate at all of these stadiums except one point to the northeast.  The sole exception is PNC Park which points to the southeast.  I thought that was an interesting part of seeing all of these satellite views.

I can’t wait to get out to there and visit some of our favorite ballparks again, and several ballparks we have never visited before.

“Play Ball!”

Stadium Frames

Here’s a random, non-game-entry post for your Wednesday night.

You might have noticed from our blog that I like to take a lot of pictures, to visit a lot of stadiums, and to make things out of wood (usually baseball bats).   Well, these three passions come together on the wall of my home office.  Last season, I made 5″ x 7″ frames to display pictures from the 9 stadiums Tim and I had visited together to that point.  (FYI, that includes Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Yankee Stadium (1923), Great American Ball Park, Progressive Field, PNC Park, Shea Stadium and Chase Field).

Well, last weekend, I finally updated my wall through the 2009 season (click to enlarge picture):

Stadium Frames Thru 2009.jpgIf you click on the picture, you will see that I added frames for the 9 new stadiums Tim and I visited in 2009:  Citi Field, Nationals Park, Yankees Stadium (2009), Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, H.H.H. Metrodome, Miller Park, U.S. Cellular Field, and Rogers Centre.

By the way, all of the links take you to the game entries that correspond with the framed pictures.

Also, I guess I should mention two more things:  In the 8″ x 10″ picture of Tim just left of center, Tim is standing in Rittenhouse Square in Center City Philadelphia, just before his first game at Citizens Bank Park (his second game of his life).

In the 8″ x 10″ picture just right of center, that is Ken Griffey, Jr. holding a sign that says “Hi Todd.”  My mom had him pose for that picture on his first day of Spring Training in 2008 (literally, his first day back in a Mariners uniform) and my folks gave it to me for my birthday.

Its good to finally be caught up with my frames.  However, soon the 2010 season will start and we are set to add Dodger Stadium, Angel Stadium Not of Los Angeles, Petco Park, AT&T Park and the Oakland-Alameda County Colesium.  And, I’d really like to get to Comerica Park, but right now it is a long shot for 2010.

C&S’s National League Stadium Panoramas

 

Its time to turn our panoramic attention toward the National League.

 

Scroll down to find:  Chase Field, Great American Ball Park, Wrigley Field, PNC Park, Miller Park, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field, Shea Stadium, and Nationals Park.

 

Coming later in 2010: AT&T Park, Dodger Stadium, Petco Park and more of many of the above.

 

N.L. West

 

Chase Field – Arizona Diamondbacks

(1998-present)

 

Chase Field section 115 (left) and section 114 (right):

chase 3B field panarama.jpg

 

Coming 2009:

Dodger Stadium – Los Angeles Dodgers (1962-present)

AT&T Park – San Francisco Giants (2000-present)

Petco Park – San Diego Padres (2004-present)

 

N.L. Central

 

Wrigley Field – Chicago Cubs

(1914-present)

 

Wrigley Field section 422 (approximately):

11 - wrigley upper home panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from outside player parking lot (right field corner – North Clark Street):

36 - wrigley outside LF panaramic.jpgWrigley Field inner concourse below center field bleachers:

35 - wrigley CF concourse exit panaramic.jpgWrigley Field bleachers section 342:

34a - wrigley CF bleachers panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 135 (front) and section 235 (behind):


32 - wrigley RF foul panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 438 (front) and section 538 (behind):

12 - wrigley upper RF panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from main cross aisle between section 404 (front) and section 504 (behind):

13 - wrigley upper LF panaramic.jpg

Wrigley Field section section 235, Row 11, Seat 4 (obstructed view of second base):

17 - wrigley sec. 235 auto panaramic.jpgWrigley Field section 226, approximately row 20 (obstructed view of pitchers mound):

8 - wrigley sec. 226 panaramic.jpgWrigley Field from small cross aisle between section 19 (front) and section 118 (behind):

5 - wrigley plate panaramic.jpgWrigley Field section 101 and section 102 (front row):

2 - wrigley first view LF panaramic.jpg

 

Great American Ball Park – Cinncinati Reds

(2003-present)

 

Great American Ball Park section 140, row Z:

13 - GrAm RF Panarama.jpg

 

PNC Park – Pittsburgh Pirates

(2001-present)

 

PNC Park from atop the standing area spiral concourse:

13 - PNC Park LF upper HR panaramic.jpgPNC Park section 302 (approximately)

PNC Park RF upper foul panaramic.jpg

 

Miller Park – Milwaukee Brewers

(2001-present)

 

Miller Park section 422:

22 - miller home upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 104, row 9, seats 21-22 (aisle seats – obstructed view of outfield):

28 - miller RF HR field panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 438:

23 - miller LF foul upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 416:

21 - miller 1B infield upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 404:

19 - miller RF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 202:

18 - miller RCF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 236:

10 - miller LCF upper panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 120 (front row):

5 - miller home field panaramic.jpgMiller Park section 124:

4 - miller 3B field panaramic.jpg

 

N.L. East

 

Citizens Bank Park – Philadelphia Phillies

(2004-present)

 

Citizens Bank Park section 421 (left) and section 420 (right):

citz home back row.jpg.

Citizens Bank Park section 423:

14 - citz upper  3B-home tarp panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park SRO counter between sections 138 (left) and section 137 (right):

citz1.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 344 (standing room counter behind back row):

citz2.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 204 in day light (standing room behind back row):

citz3.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 122 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz4.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 130 (SRO behind back row):


citz5.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 107 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz6.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 140 (SRO counter behind back row):

citz LF corner SRO panoramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 118 (front row):

citz phils dugout.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 112 (SRO behind back row):

10 - citz rf rain delay panaramic.jpg

Citizens Bank Park scoreboard and Philadelphia from LF 300-level foul concourse: 16 - citz upper LF concourse city panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 344 at evening (standing room counter behind back row):.

18 - citz upper LF panaramic.JPGCitizens Bank Park Ashburn Alley from base of Richie Ashburn statue:

24 - citz ashburn alley panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park from rooftop walkway above Ashburn Alley (night):

30 - citz CF rooftop panaramic.jpgCitzens Bank Park from deep RCF rooftop deck above Ashburn Alley:

31 - citz CF rooftop panaramic2.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 1 (front row):

4 - citz 1b field panaramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park from concourse behind section 211:

200 level RF foul panoramic.jpgCitizens Bank Park panoramic view of bullpens from section 101:

9 - bullpen tiers.jpgCitizens Bank Park suite 55:

4 - citz suite view panarama.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 235, row 9:

3 - citz panarama.jpgCitizens Bank Park section 130, row 8, seat 1:

1 - 9-12-07 Phillies Panarama2.jpgCitizens Bank Park from center field rooftop deck (day light):

3 - citz CF sun deck panarama roadtrip.jpg

 

Citi Field – New York Mets

(2009-present)

 

Citi Field from Willets Point subway platform (7-Train):

citi subway platform.jpg

Citi Field section 15 in the Sterling Club seats:

37 - citi sterling club plate panarama.jpgCiti Field section 339 (concourse) view toward scoreboard and kids’ play area:

34 - citi scoreboard kids area panarama.jpgCiti Field section 339 (back row on CF aisle):

33 - citi CF 300 level panarama.jpgCiti Field – upper deck concourse (behind home plate and above Rotunda):

32 - citi upper deck plate concourse panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 514:

31 - citi plate upper panaramic.jpgCiti Field concourse behind section 404 (approximately):

30 - citi rf foul upper concourse panarama.jpgCiti Field section 501 (back row on aisle):

29 - citi RF foul upper panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 305 (back row on aisle) Pepsi Porch:

27 - citi pepsi porch 3 panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 301 (second row) Pepsi Porch:

25 - citi pepsi porch 2 panramic.jpgCiti Field walkway to Pepsi Porch:

24 - citi walk to pepsi porch panaramic.jpgCiti Field section 122:

17 - citi section 122 panarama.jpgCiti Field section 121 (front row):

8 - citi 3B dugout panarama.jpgCiti Field section 130 & section 131 (front row):

2 - citi lf foul field panarama.jpg

Citi Field section 12 (left) and section 11(right) in the Sterling Club seats:

citi section 11-12 panorama.jpgCiti Field from aisle between section 121 (left) and Sterling Club seats (right):

citi section 121 panorama.jpg

Citi Field section 526 row 9 seats 14-15:

citi3.jpgCiti Field section 127 (standing room in concourse behind back row of seats):

citi1.jpgCiti Field section 114 (standing room concourse behind back row of seats):

citi2.jpg

 

Shea Stadium – New York Mets

(1964-2008)

 

Shea Stadium upper reserve section 10, row M, seat 7:

shea upper reserve section 10 row m seat 7.jpgShea Stadium mezzanine section 19, row A, seat 7:

shea 1B middle foul day.jpg

Shea Stadium mezzanine section 19, row A, seat 7:

shea 1B middle foul night.jpgShea Stadium section 165:

shea RF corner field level.jpgShea Stadium exterior from south (walking toward 7-Train Platform on Roosevelt Ave.):

shea exterior.jpgShea Stadium section 215 (second row):

17 - shea 1B field panorama.jpg

 

Nationals Park – Washington Nationals

(2008-present)

 

Nationals Park section 316:

DC Home Plate 3d Deck Panoramic View.jpg

Nationals Park section 101 (left) and section 102 (right):

1st field view LF panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 113 (left) and section 114 (right):

DC 3B paroramic view.jpgNationals Park bridge between section 221 (left) and section 223 (right):

DC 1st Base 2d Deck Panoramic view.jpgNationals Park between section 231 (left) and section 233 (right):

DC 2d Deck RF foul panoramic view.jpgNationals Park between section 242 (left) and 243 (right):

DC 2d Deck CF panoramic view.jpgNationals Park standing room area toward center behind section 143:

DC Field Level RCF Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park open area beyond CF fence (taken from kids play area):

CF area.jpgNationals Park from middle of “Red Loft” (after game):

DC Red Porch Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 301 (back row):

DC 3d Deck LF Foul Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 134.

DC 1B Field Level Panoramic View.jpgNationals Park section 138:

7 DC RF rain delay panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 201 (rain out of Randy Johnson’s scheduled 300th win game):

17 LF rain delay panoramic.jpgNationals Park section 117 (left) and section 118 (right):

25 -nats cubs dugout panaramic.jpgNationals Park from center field side of the “Red Loft” (during game):

24 - nats red porch panaramic.jpgNationals Park section 139 (handicap accessible seating behind back row):

15 - nats rf ice cream seasts panaramic.jpgNationals Park standing room area between section 143 and the batters’ eye:

9 - nats cf field panaramic.jpgNationals Park section 134 (handicapped accessible seating behind back row):

3 - nats 1B chxfries seats panaramic.jpg

There you go.  That is every NL panoramic ballpark view I have created and posted on our blog so far.  I love doing these, so check back in the future and there will be some new panaramics mixed in with these one. 

Baseball & The Cubbies in D.C. (7-19-2009)

On June 3, 2009, I knocked off work early and Tim and I trekked down to Nationals Park in Washington, D.C to witness a piece of history — Randy Johnson’s 300th career victory.  However, the rain put the kibosh on our plans.

July 19th was our make-up game.  Instead of seeing Randy Johnson’s 300th win, we saw Kevin Hart’s third.  It was a fun game — but as the math would reveal, it was about 100 times less memorable than if we would have got to see Randy’s big win.

The process of exchanging our rain out tickets for these tickets was made 50,000 times more difficult due to the inadequacies of the Washington Nationals telephone system.  I called them at about 4-5 different numbers I found on their website.  They all led to the same automated phone system.  No humans ever answered.  I was dumped into a “general” voicemail box and none of my calls were returned until I got creative.  Eventually the team store gave me the number 202-640-7000.  From that number, you can get a company phone directory.  I went through the front office directory on MLB.com and entered random Nationals employees into the phone directory.  The first 3-4 employees went straight to voicemail.  I was beginning to think that no one actually worked at Nationals Park.  Eventually, I reached someone.  She told me I could only make the exchange at the box office at the stadium and they wouldn’t hold tickets aside for me — just in case I didn’t show up.  So I was stuck driving 2.5 hours not knowing if they’d have any cheap seats to exchange for our cheapseats tickets.

When we got there, they didn’t.  All the cheap seats were sold out.  So we had to get tickets about twice as expensive as our original tickets.  This was frustrating.  I pulled out my card to pay the extra money for the more expensive tickets.  The guy asked me if I was buying more tickets.  “No.”  “Then you don’t need your card.”

It was the first good moment in the whole process:  they made a straight exchange for my cheap seats tickets.  This made me happy.  A small amount of redemption.  But the Nationals as an organization have a long way to go to get back in my good graces.  The handling of the rainout and then the unanswered phone messages and emails did a lot of damage.

Anyway, there is a game to report.  Let’s get to it.

To add to my already mounting frustration while heading down to the game, I missed the exit from I-95 to I-295.  So I had no clue how to get to the Park.  I saw an exit sign that said “To Naionals Park.”  So I took it.  Then I drove around totally clueless for about 15 minutes until I magically popped out of nowheresville and onto a bridge heading straight to Nationals Park.  This is what I saw:

1 - road to nats park.jpgWe entered through this entrance by the 1B line.  We’d never been around this side of the stadium, so it was good to see what it looks like over there.

We entered the stadium and there was a lot of hoopla going on — the Nats fans and employees were all jazzed up for the beginning of the game (FYI, we got there about 10 second before the Nats took the field):

2 - festive nats park.JPG

Often times, we walk into a game and Tim instantly informs me, “I want ice cream!”  Today to my surprise, he told me, “I want ice cream, after we eat lunch.”  He wanted chicken strips and fries, which interestingly is what we had at our only other game at Nationals Park.

We bought the chicken and fries and sat in the handicap accessible seats behind 1B field level seats.  This was our view:

3 - nats 1B chxfries seats panaramic.jpg

At our first game here, the attendants were dictators.  They checked tickets everywhere.  I had to sweet talk a guy to let Tim and I sit in the LAST ROW of the upper deck to eat Tim’s ice cream helmet.  I was happy to find the stadium much more relaxed at this game.

Here is Tim between french fries:

4 - serious tim.JPG

Tim was a little camera shy today.  He was all smiles and laughs all day except when the camera looked his way.  This is serious Tim.

I am excited for this entry because I felt like I got a lot of good action shots at this game.  Here is the first:

5 - johnsons on broadway.jpg

Okay.  So there really isn’t much *action* going on here.  But I wanted to get a picture of Nick Johnson and give him big SeaTown props.  Both today and at our last game at Nationals Park, N-John came to the plate accompanied by the sweet sounds of Sir Mix-A-Lot’s “Posse On Broadway.

Soon, the action picked up:  Alfonso Soriano hit a double:

6 - soriano doubles.jpg

Soriano seemed to be the only big name in the Cubs line-up.  I’m not up on the Cubs.  I’m not sure where everyone else was — no Aramis Ramirez and no Milton Bradley.  So my Cubs photos focused on Soriano.  He looks like he is going to hit a bomb on every swing he takes.

While sitting here, I noticed that the out-of-town scoreboard was telling a happy story:

7 - good news from cleveland.JPG

After eating, Tim wanted to go check out the play area in CF:

8 - mlb cheat sheet.JPG

The play area is the red and blue thing to the far right of the picture.  To the left, there are some big signs with all of the 30 MLB team logos.  Usually each stadium has the team flags or logos in order of the current standings.  Nationals Park just has the logos.  Not sure why.

 When we arrived at the play area, they had just told everyone to clear out.  Some kid had spilled some bodily fluids (not sure what) out there and they brought the hazmat trucks in to clean up.

So we stood in straight away CF and watched the game.  This was our view:

9 - nats cf field panaramic.jpg

It was a good thing we got booted out of the play area or we would have missed Soriano hitting a bomb in his second at bat:

10 - soriano bomb.jpg

In the interest of full disclosure, the top left picture is actually a foul ball right before the HR.  But the top right, is the actual HR swing.  A pretty sweet swing.  I thought we were in Chicago — the whole stadium went crazy!

Did I mention that I love my new camera?  Check out these floating ball shots I took from straight away CF:

11 - floating balls.jpg

After we got these shots, it was time for the play area:

12 - playarea.jpg

The most frequently broken rule?  No. 8 — no food or drink in the play area.  The violators:  Moms and Dads.  Not this one.

After a little while, play time was done and it was off to the RF seats for us.  Here is an interesting picture of Tim that I took through his seat:

13 - thru seat.jpg

Can you tell what Tim is doing in this picture?

The Answer:

14 - nats ice cream helmet.jpg

In the picture to the left, Tim is holding out his spoon after telling me to take a picture of his ice cream.  By the way, for the first time ever, he went with Cookies’n’Creme — and he loved it.  In the picture to the right, Tim is all concerned that I missed getting a picture of the ice cream on his spoon.  He was very invested in that shot and was upset by the idea that I might have missed it.  As you can see, I nailed it!

This was our view from our ice cream seats:

15 - nats rf ice cream seasts panaramic.jpgAfter I cream, it was time to try to catch a home run:

17 - hit it here.jpg

Unfortunately, Adam Dunn couldn’t quite find the seats in this at bat:

18 - dunn done.jpg

[NOTE:  click on picture to enlarge.  You’ll be able to see the ball in the top picture right at the bottom of the “T” in “Tickets.”]

Check out all of these empty seats:

19 - empty seats.jpg

See the yellow circle at the bottom right?  That’s where Tim and I sat for the ninth inning.

So, all season, I’ve been trying to get a good action shot of an outfielder catching a fly ball.  Its harder than it sounds because you don’t know when a ball will be hit to any given outfielder.  Somehow, I got two decent shots at this game:

20 - running catches.jpg

In the top picture, the ball has just hit the leather of Soriano’s glove.  In the bottom picture, you can see the ball a couple feet above Adam Dunn.

While we were sitting in these seats, we noticed the Nats bullpen catcher would sometimes throw his warm up ball into the stands after warming up Josh Willingham in RF.  Tim wanted to play catch.  So we decided to give it one shot at a ball before going to find a spot to play catch.  It worked like this:

21 - nelson robledo to TJCs.jpg

As far as I can tell, the Nats bullpen catcher is former career minor leaguer, Nelson Robledo.  We were sure to thank Mr. Robledo for his kindness.

Then it was off to play catch by the batting cages in CF:

22a - playing catch.jpg

In the middle picture, Tim is showing his pitching leg kick.  He just learned his pitching motion in the last couple weeks.  I didn’t teach it to him.  He just copied what he saw me and other pitchers doing.  He does a full wind-up at time too.  These pictures are poor quality because we were in a dark hallway type-area.  Eventually, we were told not to play catch in there — “BOO, NATIONALS!  BOO!”  If we can play catch in a busy area of a bustling new Yankee Stadium without incident or reprimand, surely we should be able to play catch in an empty area of Nationals Park.

Next, we headed up to the Red Porch to watch the game with the party people in the house.  People were having a good time up there.  This was our view:

24 - nats red porch panaramic.jpg

…and here is what it looks like up on the Red Porch:

23 - red porch.jpg

Next, we headed over to the seats behind the Cubs’ dugout.  Here is a panaramic from the top of the aisle:

25 -nats cubs dugout panaramic.jpg

When I took this picture, Tim was sitting on my shoulders.  I was sure this guy in the yellow shirt and Nats hat to the far right was going to kick us out of the section and tell me to take Tim off of my shoulders.   Last time we were here, that is certainly what would have happened.  However, he did just the opposite.  He told me, “You have your hands full, why don’t you grab a seat.”  Excellent idea.  Thanks.

I grabbed some seats in the fourth row.

They gave us an excellent view of Notre Dame football start Jeff Samardzija:

26 - samardzija.jpg

Hey, did I mention that future Mariners Hall of Famer, Sweet Lou Piniella was in the house?

27a - Sweet Lou.JPGIt was game time for the Nats.  Despite sending their best hitter to the plate…

27 - last hope.jpg

…Cubs Win!  Cubs Win!  Cubs Win!

28 - congrats cubs.jpg

And it was time for Kids Run the Bases:

29 - nats 1B side track.jpg

The gal standing on the grass by first base in the Nats jersey is in the process of shouting, “MARINERS!!!”  I didn’t get her back story, but she said the Mariners are her favorite team.  Good to see we’ve infiltrated the Nationals!

Here is Tim at first base:

30 - run first base.jpg

Tim ran about 10 feet passed first base and than stopped.  He turned around and he yelled that he wanted me to run with him.  He came back over to me and I explained that only kids can run the bases so I couldnt’ run with him.  In an odd twist, Tim decided he didn’t want to run without me on this day.  So we just walked around the track and looked at everything.

I got this picture of the Nats doing some field touch-ups:

31 - painting W.JPG

And with that, we left Nationals Park for the final time this season.

But before heading home, we decided to go see a few other attractions in the D.C. area — you might have heard of them:

32 - capitol area.jpg

Tim loved the fountains at the WWII memorial.

Eventually, we had to hit the road to head home.  We had directional difficulties on the way down, so we decided to have some more on the way home.  This is an easy drive.  I’m not sure what the hecked I was thinking.  All I had to do was head up I-695 and connect to I-83 in Baltimore.

Sadly, I missed the I-695 turn off from I-95.  No problem.  I figured I’d just head into Baltimore and connect to I-83 downtown…by this:


 


33 - holy baltimore batman.JPG

The Baltimoreans decided it would be an excellent idea to put a street festival on the street leading to the I-83 entrance.  Hey, no problem.   I was looking for an opportunity to detour all around downtown Baltimore.

Oh, well.  Here are our goodies for the day:


34 - nats goodies.JPG

[Note:  Ball from Robledo, ice cream helmet, exchanged ticket showing $0.00, and Nationals give-away of insulated lunch bags].

Season Fan Stats:

19 Games (plus one 5+ hour rain out with no game)
7 Stadiums
(Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field, Nationals Park, Yankee Stadium, and Fenway Park)
14 Teams (Mariners, A’s, Rangers, Rays, Orioles, Tigers, Red Sox, Yankees, Phillies, Mets, Nationals, Cubs,
Braves and Padres, Dodgers — and sort of the Giants)
15 Ice Cream Helmets (Mariners (4), Phillies (3), Mets, Nationals (3), Red Sox (3) and Yankees)
18 Baseballs (12 Mariners, 2 Rangers, 1 Phillies, 1 Red Sox, 1 Umpire, 1 Nationals) 
4 Divisions Closed Out (So far in Tim’s Life — AL West, AL East, NL West, NL East)
 
3 Autographs (King Felix Hernandez, Jason Phillips, Ryan Perry) 
2 Player/G.M. Photographs (King Felix Hernandez, Jack Zduriencik, Ryan Perry)
 
5 Mascot Pictures (Mariners Moose (2), Orioles Bird (2), 3 Presidents (Nats), Screech (Nats) — Honorable Mention: The Green Monster statue bench)

An Evening At Nationals Park (Without Baseball) – 6/3/09

On the way home from Nationals Park, at around 1 a.m., my mom gave me some good advice:  “You should stop driving around to these milestone games.  It doesn’t work for you.”

She was right.

Last season, Tim and I went to see Griffey play in Philadelphia.  He was sitting on 599 home runs.  I REALLY wanted us to be there for number 600.  In three days, he pinch hit twice.  Swung the bat once.  Walked twice on 9 pitches.

A couple weeks ago, we went to see Jamie Moyer try to win his 250th game of this career.  He looked great.  Then it all fell a part and he lost.

But I wasn’t deterred.  I’d been tracking Randy Johnson’s march to 300 wins like a hawk.  I’d been hoping he would be somewhere nearby when he was sitting on 299.  Then last week, it all fell into place.  He won number 299 and his next start was against the lowly Nationals.  It would be only 2.5 hours from our house.  Perfect!

Despite previous milestone failures, I had to try it.  It was too important to pass up.

The weather report wasn’t good.  But when we walked up to the stadium, it looked like we were set to get the game in.

The grounds crew was chalking the field:

1 nats chalking.jpg

The MLB Network’s Hazel Mae gave us a smile and an awkward little wave:

2 hi hazle.jpg

Giants skipper Bruce Bochy was out and about:

3 bochy.jpg

Yep, things were looking pretty good.  Close to business as usual.  Baseball and a 300th win coming soon.  Or so we thought.

We decided to visit the playset in center field before the game started.  On the way, we ran into Screech:

4 hi screech.jpg

Tim had a great time in the play area.  But after a few minutes came THE RAIN!

We took refuge under the concourse behind RF where people were enjoying their dinners in the covered picnic area:

6 the people hide.jpg

Yep, all of a sudden, baseball as usual didn’t seem quite as certain.

The skies they were a-threatenin’

7 DC RF rain delay panoramic.jpg

We walked the spacious concourse from foul pole to foul pole, and it was packed:

8 packed concourse.jpg

Then the rain REALLY started to come down.  The Nationals put up notices to the crowd telling them to hide in the concourse…and promising more information to come:

8b the rain cometh.jpg

We checked out the Nats bullpen to see if there were any pitchers hanging out in there:

9 bullpen ball.jpg

See that security guard sitting back with his legs out?  See the ball in his right hand?  I don’t want to give anything away about this story, but I must note that that is the ONE AND ONLY baseball that I saw while attending this “game.”  (Well, except for in the team store).

Did I mention there was a lot of rain?

11 Lake NatsPark.jpg

This is what it looks like when a lot of rain meets poor drainage planning:

12 Natty Waterfall.jpg

We sat down in the first row behind the bullpen and Tim kept himself entertained crawling around by my feet:

 
14 tim entertains himself.jpg

Eventually, the rain stopped!  We’d already been at the park a long time there was no baseball being played…Tim was confused:

13 tim wheres the game.jpg

The grounds crew raced out to start preparing the field for BASEBALL!  Note the huge splashes as this guy runs through the outfield:

16 splish splash.jpg That guy and his buddies started pulling the tarp off of the infield…

15 tarp removal.jpg

…and into the outfield grass:

17 LF rain delay panoramic.jpg

This Giant’s coach started squeegeeing the bullpen — looking like they were gonna play a game:

18 squiggy coach.jpg

And then came the diamond dust…lots of it:

19 lots of diamond dust.jpg

At this point, heck, it sure seems like we’re playing baseball tonight.  Yes!  Bring on Randy Johnson’s 300th win!

But first, Tim requested ice cream.  Even though the game hadn’t started yet, I agreed we could go get his ice cream helmet.  We headed to the concourse behind home plate so we could go out to RF where there are a bunch of standing counters or covered seats where Tim could sit and eat his ice cream.

However, before we could get around home plate, we ran into a familar face, snagger and MLBlogger extraordinaire Zack Hample.

 

20 with zack.jpg

(Note, in this picture I’m not toting my usual black Rawlings Trap-eze.  I made an exception for this game and brought my black Rawlings Randy Johnson RBG10B.)

How did I end up meeting up with Zack at the game you ask?  How about a little overly detailed back story?

So, my favorite ball park of all time is the one and only Kingdome.  Many a night, I find myself searching google images for pictures of the Kingdome.  Like this.  A couple months back, I came across a Kingdome picture titled “Alli Zack Kingdome.”  I’d actually come across it before in my quest for Kingdome pictures.  I thought to myself, who is this dude whose picture has now come up twice when I’ve searched for my beloved Kingdome?  So, I followed the link to his webpage.  I ran through a number of the pictures from every year of his life — including many pictures at different stadiums wearing different teams’ apparrel.  Eventually, I found links to numerous articles and video clips and learned that he catches a whole lot of balls at games.  Then I found his blog.  This was the off-season, so I pretty much scanned around old entries from different games.  I really enjoyed all of the random stadium pictures — like this stuff.  So, I started following his blog.

Tim, Zack and I ended up wandering over toward the seats behind third base.  Zack wanted to watch to see if any players were out on the field.  (NOTE:  at no point during this “game” did I ever see a single player on the field of play — that’s from 5:45 to 10:45, no players on the field).  Zack and I chatted while Tim stood on a railing giving Zack what seemed to be thousands of fist bumps and high fives…some of them might have just been slaps — the boy was getting tired and restless.  Here is what it looked like:

21 multiple high fives.jpg

After a while, I got Tim his ice cream helmet — real chocolate ice cream (not soft serve) in a helmet for $5.00 — and then the three of us sat in the back row of the field level seats behind third base.

Maybe I’m an optimist, but it seemed like we were close to playing some baseball.  The field was looking a whole lot better.  It wasn’t raining.  But that darn tarp was still sitting in the outfield.

22 field looking better.jpg

Worse than that, there was just no urgency on the field.  It seemed like they should have been working harder to get the tarps off of the field so the game could start.  But no, they were working at a snails pace.

Even more frustrating was that the Nationals were giving us absolutely no updates about what was happening.  Literally, for several hours the only “update” was a sign (shown in a picture or two above) that reassured us that the Nationals would provide updates about the situation.

At one point, we debated whether they could get the field ready to start at 9:00 p.m.  Well, that was soon a moot point.  The rain returned:

23 Act II Return of the Rain.jpg

Tim pointed to the sky and told me all about the “rain buggies” and “thunder monsters.”  He asked me “is the baseball game over?”  I reassured him, “no, it hasn’t started yet.”

A kind member of the crowd provided comic relief by running on the field, rounding the bases, and then took out a security guy at home plate (the guy in yellow):

24 fan removal squad.jpg

 Remember how I said the Nats gave us no updates?  That isn’t entirely accurate.  At some point in the 9 o’clock hour (maybe later), they announced that the buses to the naval ship yard (or something like that) will run for “half an hour after the conclusion of tonight’s game.”  Is it just me or doesn’t that sorta imply there is going to be a game tonight?

Around 10-something, the umpires came out and tested the outfield.  Then they left.  Nothing changed.  No announcements.  More sitting and waiting.

A while later, they did it again.  This time, they had a big meeting by the third base dugout after testing the field.  It looked like one of them signaled a “no go” sign to Manny Acta, but then he stopped and walked over to Acta and told him something.  Then the umps left.  A bunch of Nats were still in their dugout.  Shouldn’t they be gone if the umps told them it was postponed?  They kept standind around in there.

But a couple minutes later, all of the Nats left at once as if on cue.  Maybe they’re leaving to get ready to go home?  Maybe they’re leaving to get ready for the game?  A couple minutes later, a guy grabs the Nats gatorade coolers and took them into the clubhouse.  Not a good sign.  But still no announcement.  What is going on?

We decided to get up and look for some food.  Everything was closed.  No food or drink available in the stadium.  Do they know something they’re not telling us?  Here is a view of the field through the Red Porch restaurant, which was closed:

25 no food for you.jpg

Finally, at 10:47, they called the game:

26 call at 1047.jpg Very dissappointing.  A couple minutes later, they announced they’d give us tickets to another game later in the season — you mean I have to find a reason to come back again?

Tim and I headed for the shuttle to the RFK parking lot.  Tim was fast asleep 5 minutes into the car right home.  We arrived home a little after 2:00 a.m.  Before heading off to bed, I checked my email.  I had an email from the Nationals saying the game was postponed.  The email was received at 10:05pm.  That means they had emailed me about the game 40 minutes before they announced it in the stadium — incredible!

The worst part is that Randy Johnson pitched today and won his 300th game. AND WE MISSED IT!!!  Well, we watched it on TV:

26 game on without us.JPG

I felt a little sorry for Randy because there were only about 5 fans at the game.  It was terrible.  He should have won number 300 at home with a packed house or somewhere where the stands would be filled with Bit Unit fans cheering him on like crazy.

Oh, well.

CONGRATULATIONS, RANDY!!!  Excellent career.  Thanks for the 130 wins you brought the Mariners!

Season Fan Stats:

12 Games (plus one 5+ hour rain out with no game)
5 Stadiums
(Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field and Nationals Park)
12 Teams (Mariners, A’s, Rangers, Rays, Orioles, Tigers, Phillies, Mets, Nationals,
Braves and Padres, Dodgers — and sort of the Giants)
10 Ice Cream Helmets (Mariners (4), Phillies (3), Mets and Nationals (2))
5 Baseballs (2 Mariners, 2 Rangers, 1 Phillies)
3 Divisions Closed Out (So far in Tim’s Life — AL West, NL East, AL West)

1 Player Autograph (Ryan Perry)
1 Player Photograph (Ryan Perry)

3,897 Miles driven/flown to games (season)
5 Mascot Pictures (Mariners Moose (2), The Bird (O’s), 3 Presidents (Nats), Screech (Nats))

Phillies at Nationals Park (5/17/09)

This entry was supposed to be titled “Moyer’s 250 Bid – Take 2.”  Unfortunately, our bid to see Jamie Moyer win the 250th game of his career failed before we even left for the game.  I learned on Saturday night that Chan Ho Park would be pitching Sunday, May 17th in Washington, D.C. rather than Jamie Moyer.  Moyer is a great pitcher.  But its tough, even for a great pitcher, to get a win in a game you don’t pitch.

So Tim and I would have to focus on our other two main goals of the day – (i) checking out Nationals Park for the first time and (ii) participating in Kids Run the Bases after the game.  Our pursuit of those goals met with great success, as explained in detail below.

Nationals Park can be both incredibly expensive and quite affordable, depending on how you want to “do” the stadium.  For example, parking in the garage connected to the stadium is FORTY BUCKS!!!  That’s ridiculous.  On the other hand, the parking route we took was both an adventure and totally FREE!  You see, the Nationals have arranged for their fans to park for FREE at RFK Stadium and then take a FREE shuttle bus to a point about 2 blocks from Nationals Park.  Here is what it looked like:

rfk bus.jpg

Here is our first view of the Park walking from the bus:

1st stadium view.jpg

Here is our first view of the field as we entered the Park from the LCF entrance:

1st field view LF panoramic.jpgAs you might know, I am a Mariners fan.  But alas, I did live in Philadelphia for three years and I have no NL allegiance, so i bought a Phillies BP jersey back in 1999 or so.  I doubt I’ve worn it since 2000.  But this was only my second Phils road game, so I thought I’d give it a try wearing the Phillies jersey and my Reading Phillies hat to see if some nice Phillies player would reward me and Tim for coming to see them on the road.  Now, wearing the visitors’ jersey/hat even if you hate the team is a classic “ballhawk” technique.  I am not a ballhawk, but generally I have no problem with the ballhawks doing it.  But, personally, I felt dirty as heck wearing Phillies stuff, even though I was there rooting for the Phillies.  It just hurt me right down to my Mariners core (in fact, I couldn’t do it without wearing a M’s shirt under the Phils jersey).  Anyway, more on that later. 

So, as we entered the stadium, we saw a bunch of Phils stretching behind 3B.  So we headed over there where this was our view:

DC 3B paroramic view.jpg

We headed down to the field level where they have a little trough (for lack of a better term) where there are just a couple seats in a big aisle).  We watched the guys warm up amongst a sea of Phillies fans:

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Yep, to the left, that is team leading (pick an offensive category) Raul Ibanez warming up his legs.  To the right, Ryan Howard, Shane Victorino and Jimmy Rollins stand in front for the national anthem while Chase Utley, Jayson Werth, Pedro Feliz and a trainer stand behind them.

 After the anthem, the guys started playing catch and running (sorta) sprints:

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In the photo to the left, you can see Jimmy Rollins playing catch with Chase Utley (off camera) and Ryan Howard playing catch with Shane Victorino.  After a few mintues, Jimmy and Shane set their gloves down on the foul line with the balls sitting on the grass next to them.  Then they started running sprints.

To the right, you can see that, after finishing playing catch with Victorino, Ryan Howard came over to the stands and started signing autographs for 5-10 minutes.  As you can see, almost everyone down in the trough bunched up next to Howard in hopes of getting his autograph.  We didn’t have a pen or anything worth getting the former NL M.V.P. to sign, so we stood our ground.  The difference was, after Ryan started signing, we were pretty much standing all alone, no more sea of Phillies fans surrounding us.

Tim was on my shoulders (where his Mariners shirt was hidden behind my head).  I was wearing my Phils jersey and R-Phils hat.  We looked like a nice father-son Phillies fan combo.  Jimmy Rollins took note.  When he was finished running, he grabbed his glove and ball and took a couple steps toward the dugout.  He then stopped, turned back toward us and fired his baseball directly into my glove.  Nice – our first ball EVER from a Phillies player:

jimmy ball.jpg

A few minutes later, the game started.  The baseball we got from J-Roll looked the same, but I looked different:

M's Jimmy Ball.jpg

J-Roll shouldn’t feel as if he got duped.  We still rooted for the Phils.  I just had to show my true colors during the game.  Also, I did put my R-Phils hat back on after Tim got chocolate ice cream on his fingers and I thought he would get the white portion of my M’s hat chocolately.  But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Like usual, we had some cheap tickets.  Not SRO, this time we were apparently high in the rafters of the RF foul territory stands.  We never went to our section.  Instead, we started walking around getting to know the stadium.  Let me tell you something, unlike the team that plays there, Nationals Park is beautiful.  Despite a couple negatives, it instantly ranks right up among my favorite ball parks.

Why don’t we take a look around?  This is reverse order as we walked, but how about we start behind the plate in the third deck:

DC Home Plate 3d Deck Panoramic View.jpgThe second deck from the concourse behind first base:

DC 1st Base 2d Deck Panoramic view.jpgThe second deck RF corner (foul):

DC 2d Deck RF foul panoramic view.jpgThe second deck CF:

DC 2d Deck CF panoramic view.jpgAs you can tell, its a beautiful park.  In addition to checking out this great park, Tim and I also had a goal of testing out our new digital camera.  It has a great zoom – both optical and digital.  Here are a couple pictures taken from various locations in the Park:

jimmyx2 ryan and chase.jpgOn the left (upper and lower) is Jimmy Rollins.  I took these pictures on back-to-back pitches from the spot where I took that last panoramic in center field.

At top right, Ryan Howard is seen batting in the first inning.  I took that picture from just behind the RL foul pole.

Below Howard, is Chase Utley also hitting in the first inning.  I took this from the field level concourse behind all of the seats a little bit down the line from first base.

How about another panoramic?  Here is CF from the field level concourse:

DC Field Level RCF Panoramic View.jpgOkay, now, I took all of these panoramic views while walking around in the concourses circling the stadium.  Although fans in their seats usually aren’t paying a lot of attention to the concourses, they are an important part of any stadium.  Bad concourses make a stadium feel cramped.  Open concourses from which you can see the field make the stadium feel bigger and they let fans maximize their time at the ball park (ex:  they can still watch the game while standing in line for some food).  Nationals Park has GREAT concourses.  HUGE.  Mostly all open.  Not crowded.  Excellent.  Here are a couple examples:

DC spacious concourses.jpg

Walk these great concourses and eventually you’ll find yourself in biggest open area I’ve ever seen inside a ball park:

CF area.jpg

The Field Level CF panoramic a couple pictures ago was taken on the opposite side of that escalator.  The Second Deck CF panoramic and the pictures of Jimmy Rollins batting a couple more pictures above were taken from the second deck just to the left of the big “DC” sign and under the picture of the Nationals celebrating (they must have won a game?).

The black strip at the top center (where it says “GET YOUR”) is the “Red Porch.”  I’m not quite sure what the deal is with the red porch.

The building to the right is a massively expensive parking garagle.  The openings on the ground level are various fan attractions.  The one with the yellow sign is a “stuff a bear” type place where you can make your own Nationals mascot.  The “Strike Zone” at the far right of the picture has a batting cage where the ball shoots out of a video screen.  When we watched it, Randy Johnson was pitching and the ball would shoot through the screen through his hand.  Pretty cool.  In the back, there was a similar game with pitching.  I watched a guy pitch to Larry “Chipper” Jones.

And right behind me as I took this picture?  The play area:

playset in CF.jpgTim loved this play set.  From a father’s perspective, it seemed better than the playset at Safeco Field, but a not quite as good as the playset at Citizens Bank Park.  The worst part about it is that it is massively far away from the field and there is no TV to watch the game.  It would be perfect if the Nats would follow the Mets lead and put a BIG SCREEN on the back of the scoreboard for all of the parents watching their kids play in the CF play area.

Anyway, back to the tour.  Here is a post-game picture from the deck of the aforementioned Red Porch:

DC Red Porch Panoramic View.jpg

And here is a picture looking at the Red Porch from the 1B field level seats:

Scrolling Bar on Red Porch.jpg

Well, look at that…I stand corrected.  The “Red Porch” is really called the “Red Loft.”  Hmm…I’m wondering if that is the upstairs and the downstairs is called the Red Porch.  I definitely heard someone call it the Red Porch during the game.  Anyway, in the last panoramic, Tim and I took the pictures standing under the “Red” in the “Red Loft” sign in the last picture.

The only bad part of the concoures at Nationals Park is that the Red Porch/Loft cuts off all view of field as you walk from CF to LF (or vice versa).  Same thing with the field level concourse behind home plate.  Its just like Citi Field.  They have field level suites and a restaurant that cut off all view of the game for *commoners* walking behind home plate.  But I like the way the Nationals did it more than the Mets.  The Mets concourse is like a dark cave that feels like it is 100 yards away from the game.  The Nats concourse is bright and airy and it has a team store entrance and big pictures on the wall telling about the history of baseball in Washington, D.C…check it out:

DC Behind Home Plate Field Level Suites.jpg

But, back to the outfield.  Here are some interesting statues on the back side of the Red Porch/Loft:

statutes in motion.jpg

Well, look at that.  I am right. The field level is called the “Red Porch” (as shown in the middle picture behind Frank Howard (who by the way shouldn’t have swung at that pitch, he’s reaching too far!)).

Note, PNC Park in Pittsburgh also has a Josh Gibson statue.

Back to the panoramic views, here is the RF corner from the third deck:

DC 3d Deck LF Foul Panoramic View.jpgThis picture leads to the final negative point about Nationals Park:  the ushers guard the seats like they are made of gold.  I had to sweet talk an usher to persuade him to let me and Tim sit in the BACK ROW of the LAST SECTION in the UPPER DECK!  There is a fourth deck starting a little closer to home plate.  But where I took this picture, we were literally sitting in the back row of the highest section at the greatest distance from home plate down the 3B line.  Is that ridiculous or what?

So how did we get to sit in these coveted seat?  I told the usher Tim’s ice cream was melting, we were all the way across the stadium from our seats, and I was looking desparately for a standing room spot with a standing counter where Tim could sit and eat his ice cream…but there are none in the third deck down the 3B line.  So in the face of melting ice cream, the usher relented and let us take the empty seats in the empty row in the highest and most distant seats from home plate.

Here is Tim and his ice cream and, in the distance, the Washington Monument:

ice cream helmet and WA monument.jpg

There is a big walking ramp down from the third deck to the field level in the LF corner.  As I stood on that ramp, I took the picture of the Washington Monument to the right above.  I said to Tim (sitting on my shoulders), “That’s the Washington Monument, Tim.”  Two seconds later, some random 50’ish year old white-male-American walks up to me, “Are you serious?  That’s the Washington Monument?  Cool!”  He was dead serious.  It was p-a-t-h-e-t-i-c.

Anyway, as I mentioned earlier, I posted this panoramic tour in reverse order of how Tim and I actually walked.  We really came from CF to RF to home plate, to an ice cream stand in the third deck behind 3B and then out to the LF corner.  On our walk from the ice cream stand to the LF corner, I spotted the Capitol Building from the concourse:

The picture to the right above is also taken from the ramp down to field level.  But, once again, I’m getting ahead of myself.

Before heading down the ramp, I tested my camera out a bit more.  Here are some more action shots:

Jimmy Hits Foul.jpg

Here we see J-Roll take a pitch and then hit another foul.

raulx3 shane.jpg

The top right picture of Raul Ibanez was also taken from the third deck in the LF corner.  The others were taken elsewhere…as should be evident.  In the bottom right, I’ve snuck a picture of Shane Victorino in with three Ibanez pictures.

Pretty much every swing I took a picture of at this game resulted in a foul ball, a foul pop out, or an infield pop out.  No hits or homeruns to speak of.

Okay, so it was time to head down that ramp.  From the ramp, I took this cool picture of the concourse going from the LF corner out to CF:

LF Concourse Area.jpg

Note the vegetation growing on the roof of the concession stand.  This prompted Tim to tell me that there are no plants growing on our roof because, “Our roof isn’t flat.  Our roof is a triangle.”

Once we got down the ramp, we stood for a little bit behind the LF seats where we saw the Presidents race:

Presidents Race.jpg

After the race, the Presidents headed out to CF and took pictures with fans.  They were mobbed by people.  I really wanted a picture with Teddy Roosevelt, who looked hilarious, but it wasn’t in the cards.  The Presidents were a big hit at the game.  They have George Washington, Abe Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt…and someone…I have no clue who the fourth President is.  Anyway, the Nats also have a silly looking eagle named “Screech” (I think).  But he is a pretty weak mascot.  The Presidents were far superior.

After the race, we headed down into the LF seats and got a picture of the visitors’ bullpen (shown here with an inside-shot of the Nats bullpen):

Grass Turf Bullpens.jpg

This Phillies fan in the middle looked somewhat protective of the Phils’ bullpen.  Note, the visitors’ bullpen (to the right) is grass, but the Nats’ bullpen (left) is turf.  I’m not sure why this is, but my guess is that there is access through the Nats’ bullpen to a big tunnel system under the stadium.  Possibly they drive vehicles through the Nats’ bullpen from time-to-time and put in turf so the grass wouldn’t get torn up.  Just a guess.

We then headed back to the second deck in RF where we got one of the stadium fanfoto gals to take a picture of us with my camera:

TJCs in DC.jpg

Finally, we settled into some seats for the last 2-3 innings of the game.  The ushers had apparently lost some of their motivation.  He easily slipped into some really nice seats down the 1B line.  Here was our view:

DC 1B Field Level Panoramic View.jpg

See that light stand all the way across the stadium in the LF corner?  See that last section of seats on the third deck that hide the left side of the light tower?  That is the section where I had to persuade an usher to let us sit for a couple innings (and to be clear, in case I wasn’t earlier, at first, he in fact told me that he “couldn’t do it” when I asked him if we could temporarily sit in the back row).

Anyway, there was no one else in our row in this section down the 3B line.  However, there was a group of maybe 8 young 20s’ish year old Nats fans sitting two rows behind us.  Tim flirted it up like crazy with two young gals.  At the time, the Nats were winning 6-5 and the gals (and their whole group) were all smiles and giggles.  Here is Tim cheesing it up for the ladies:

 
Tim in DC 1B Field Seats.jpg

Tim’s new friends’ mood changed abruptly in the top of the eighth.  With runners on first and second and no outs, Pedro Feliz laid down a nice bunt toward third.  Zimmerman and Jesus Colome converged on the ball.  Either could have grabbed it.  Colome did and he made what seemed to be a perfect throw to first where second baseman, Anderson Hernandez, was covering first.  By my first hand account, the throw was perfect and Feliz should have been out at first.  Instead, Hernandez jumped out of the way of the ball and let it sail into foul territory down the 1B line.  Both runs scored and Feliz made it to third.  Anderson said he could not see the ball because of the crowd.   I guess he isn’t used to having more than 10,000 fans scattered throughout the stadium.  Amazingly, they gave the error to Colome for making a perfect throw that Hernandez simply failed to catch.

When this happened, the stadium exploded with Phillies cheers.  But the people sitting behind us never uttered another word.  Their win was gone

We actually missed the ninth inning and the Phillies win because we were lined up outside the RF side of the stadium — it was time for Kids Run the Bases!  We were toward the front of the long, long, long line of kids.  As we waited in line, an usher told me to take Tim off my shoulders, “you know, for safety.”  Okay, whatever.

We started our run the bases experience with our standard picture by the RF wall footage sign:

DC 335 RF Sign.jpg

Tim then stretched his legs with some pre-bases sprints down the RF foul warning track:

DC RF Foul Warning Track run.jpg

I took a shot of the Nats’ dug out (shown to the left, with the visitors’ dug out on the right):

DC Dugouts.jpg

Then Tim was off to the races:

tjc at 1B in DC.jpg

The Nats seemed to have 100 people out there on the field working.  It was impossible to navigate the warning track and get even a half-way decent picture of Tim rounding second, which was HIGHLY dissapointing.

But I got a great shot of Tim rounding third:

tjc rounding third in DC.jpg

Then it was impossible to get a good shot of Tim scoring at home plate — that is more standard, I’ve never got a good picture of Tim at home plate yet in the three run-the-bases Tim has done so far.

We took a couple more shots as we left the field of play:

DC Field picts.jpg

So, that was it.  Our game experience was essentially over. 

Sad.

Very sad.

Particularly because the next weekend would be our first weekend not to go to a game this season.

In fact, we wouldn’t have another game until May 31st.

Sad.

We walked around the LF seats a bit more.

We looked at the visitors’ bullpen close up outside of the watchful eye of that concerned Phillies fan.

We went up to the Red Loft where we took the pictures for that panoramic up above.

Then we sadly headed toward the CF exit, the same one we’d passed through just 45 minutes before to line up to run the bases.

At the bottom of the exit stairs, we turned right and we started walking down the street.

We spotted the end of the run-the-bases line.  Only 30 yards long now.  Those lucky kids still with all of that fun ahead of them.

We walked sorta close to the wall as we passed down the wide sidewalk.

Tim was on my shoulders again.  That same usher who told me to take Tim down “you know, for safety” was still standing by the line.

She had to recognize us.  We’d just spoken with each other 45 minutes ago.  Everyone at the game was wearing bright red Phillies and Nats gear, and we were wearing dark blue Mariners gear.

But then she uttered seven magical words that let me know she most certainly did not recognize us, “Does he want to run the bases?”

I respond, pointing, “Oh, is this the line?” (as if we’d been looking for it for the past hour).

“Yeah!  Have fun!”

“Sweet!”

Tim was officially (I certified it OFFICIAL), the last kid to round the bases and touch home plate and I got a great shot of it:

Tim Last to Touch Home in DC.jpg

It was pretty awesome.  All of the Presidents, Screech and a boat load of Nats employees were on the field (again preventing a good picture at 2B), and because he was the last kid, they all followed Tim to home plate.  As you can see, as he stood at home, he was surrounded by employees and mascots all cheering for him.  Very satisfying.

Plus, because we were last, we were able to right a past wrong — we got that coveted picture with Teddy Roosevelt — and it is a keeper:

TJCs and Teddy R.jpg

A great day!  We give Nationals Park two thumbs up.

One more game note:  we saw Sergio Escalona make his major league debut and earn the first win of his career pitching the 7th inning for the Phillies.  The day before the game, Escalona was assigned to the Reading Phillies.  Good job, Sergio.

Season Fan Stats:

11 Games (double digits!)
5 Stadiums (Safeco Field, Camden Yards, Citizens Bank Park, Citi Field and Nationals Park)
11 Teams (Mariners, A’s, Rangers, Rays, Orioles, Phillies, Mets, Nationals,   
Braves and Padres, Dodgers)
9 Ice Cream Helmet (Mariners (4), Phillies (3), Mets and Nationals)
5 Baseballs (2 Mariners, 2 Rangers, 1 Phillies)
3 Divisions Closed Out (AL West, NL East, AL West)
5 Mascot Pictures (Mariners Moose (2), The Bird (O’s), 3 Presidents (Nats))